PompeiiinPictures

  

 

 

 

Back
Home
Up
Next




IX.4.16 Pompeii. Terme Centrali or Central Baths. Entrance from Vicolo di Tesmo.

Entrance to Open Area.

 

Terme Centrali or Central Baths Plan

 

These baths were begun after the 62AD earthquake, and were still under construction at the time of the eruption in 79AD.

The baths occupied this entire insula whose original houses had been demolished to make way for the new baths.

IX.4.18 on the north side was the main entrance “a” from the Via di Nola.

IX.4.5 on the west side was an entrance into the palaestra “d” from Via Stabiana.

IX.4.10 on the south side was a small entrance into the palaestra “d” past a multi seat latrine “e”from an unnamed vicolo

There were two other smaller entrances from Vicolo di Tesmo, probably service doorways, on the eastern side of the insula at IX.4.15 and 16.

IX.4.15 on the east side led to service area “t” from Vicolo di Tesmo.

This contained the furnace area and a small garden divided from it by a wall.

IX.4.16 on the east side led to an open area “u” from Vicolo di Tesmo.

This had a small peristyle and a corridor that led to apodyterium “i”.

During the excavation, the archaeologists found the remains of the demolished residential houses in the area of the palaestra, which had not been entirely cleared by the people building the new baths.

See Notizie degli Scavi di Antichità, June 1877, p. 445, description and finds.

See BdI, 1877, p. 214-223.

See BdI, 1878, p. 251-4.

See La Rocca, De Vos and De Vos, 1976. Guida Archeologica di Pompei. Mondadori Editore, p. 307-9.

 

IX.4.16 Pompeii. September 2011. Entrance on Vicolo di Tesmo. Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

IX.4.16 Pompeii. September 2011. Entrance on Vicolo di Tesmo. Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

 

IX.4.16 Pompeii. May 2005. Entrance from Vicolo di Tesmo. Entrance to open area “u”.

IX.4.16 Pompeii. May 2005. Entrance from Vicolo di Tesmo.

Entrance to open area “u”.

 

 

IX.4.16 Pompeii. September 2011. Open area “u” with three pilasters that my have been supports for a roof. The entrance to the corridor into apodyterium or vestibule “i” can be seen in the wall at the rear. Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

IX.4.16 Pompeii. September 2011. Open area “u” with three pilasters that my have been supports for a roof.

The entrance to the corridor into apodyterium or vestibule “i” can be seen in the wall at the rear.

Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

 

IX.4.16 Pompeii. May 2005. Looking west from entrance across the open area “u”, described by Mau, towards the corridor leading into the area “i” which may have been a changing room. The doorway at the far end would have led to the palaestra [d].

IX.4.16 Pompeii. May 2005.

Looking west from entrance across the open area “u”, described by Mau, towards the corridor leading into the area “i” which may have been a changing room.

The doorway at the far end would have led to the palaestra [d].

 

IX.4.16 Pompeii. September 2011. Looking south-west along open area “u” towards service area “t”. Laconicum “r” is in the centre. Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

IX.4.16 Pompeii. September 2011. Looking south-west along open area “u” towards service area “t”.

Laconicum “r” is in the centre. Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

 

IX.4.16 Pompeii. May 2005. Looking south-west along open area “u” towards service area “t”. Laconicum “r” is in the centre.

IX.4.16 Pompeii. May 2005. Looking south-west along open area “u” towards service area “t”.

Laconicum “r” is in the centre.

 

IX.4.16 Pompeii. May 2005. Looking north-west from entrance across open area “u”.
According to Mau
“Between the rooms of the Baths and the eastern vicolo, there was only an area of open space, accessible by the two doorways from the eastern vicolo, and from which by a corridor you would pass into the vestibule [“i”].  
In the northern part are 3 pilasters of brick and limestone cut to look like masonry bricks, and it seems that they should have supported a roof  that in the guise of a portico would have covered the north side, and a part of the west side”. 
See BdI, 1878, (p253 of pages 251- 254).

IX.4.16 Pompeii. May 2005. Looking north-west from entrance across open area “u”.

According to Mau

“Between the rooms of the Baths and the eastern vicolo, there was only an area of open space, accessible by the two doorways from the eastern vicolo, and from which by a corridor you would pass into the vestibule [“i”]. 

In the northern part are 3 pilasters of brick and limestone cut to look like masonry bricks, and it seems that they should have supported a roof  that in the guise of a portico would have covered the north side, and a part of the west side”.

See BdI, 1878, (p253 of pages 251- 254).

 

IX.4.16 Pompeii. September 2011. Entrance doorway sill. Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

IX.4.16 Pompeii. September 2011. Entrance doorway sill.

Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

 

IX.5 Pompeii.   Vicolo di Tesmo looking south, from near IX.4.16

IX.5 Pompeii. Vicolo di Tesmo looking south, from near IX.4.16

 

IX.5 Pompeii.  Vicolo di Tesmo looking south from Via di Nola. (IX.4.16 on the right).

IX.5 Pompeii.  Vicolo di Tesmo looking south from Via di Nola. (IX.4.16 on the right).

 

IX.5 Pompeii.  Vicolo di Tesmo looking south from Via di Nola. (IX.4.16 on the right).

IX.5 Pompeii.  Vicolo di Tesmo looking south from Via di Nola. (IX.4.16 on the right).

 

 

Terme Centrali or Central Baths Plan