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VI.17.23 Pompeii. Steps to peristyle (Blocked). Excavated from 1771.

 

VI.17.23 Pompeii. Two steps to peristyle, in room on north side of shop at VI.17.24.

VI.17.23 Pompeii. September 2005. Two steps to peristyle, in room on north side of shop at VI.17.24.

 

VI.17.23 Pompeii. May 2011. Looking towards small room on north side of shop at VI.17.24, leading to entrance to VI.17.23. Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

VI.17.23 Pompeii. May 2011.

Looking towards small room on north side of shop at VI.17.24, leading to entrance to VI.17.23.

Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

 

VI.17.23 Pompeii. May 2005. Small room with steps to peristyle.

VI.17.23 Pompeii. May 2005. Small room with steps to peristyle.

 

VI.17.23 Pompeii. Plan showing from left to right entrances VI.17.26, 25, 24, 23, 22, 21, 20, 19.  See Mazois, F., 1824. Les Ruines de Pompei: Second Partie. Paris: Firmin Didot. (p. 72, Pl. XXX)
According to Jashemski, this large house with three floors adapted its plan to the terrain of the volcanic ledge it was built on. The peristyle garden to the north of the atrium was on the street level. This garden was enclosed by a portico on the south, west and north, supported by 14 columns and 2 engaged columns. A large triclinium opened off the west portico and had a view of the garden. See Jashemski, W. F., 1993. The Gardens of Pompeii, Volume II: Appendices. New York: Caratzas. (p.165, and plan)
 The large peristyle garden on the lowest level was surrounded by a portico supported by 40 pillars.  According to Mazois, the portico was enclosed with glass windows.  In the middle of the garden there was a rectangular pool with a semicircular projection on the west.  The marble fountain statuette of  a boy with a goose (now in Naples Museum, inventory number 6111) reported from this house would have been a garden decoration.  See Jashemski, W. F., 1993. The Gardens of Pompeii, Volume II: Appendices. New York: Caratzas. (p.165, and plan)
PAH, vol 1, pt 1, p.301 (Nov 8 1778)

VI.17.23 Pompeii. Plan showing from left to right entrances VI.17.26, 25, 24, 23, 22, 21, 20, 19.

See Mazois, F., 1824. Les Ruines de Pompei: Second Partie. Paris: Firmin Didot. (p. 72, Pl. XXX)

 

According to Jashemski, this large house with three floors adapted its plan to the terrain of the volcanic ledge it was built on.

The peristyle garden to the north of the atrium was on the street level.

This garden was enclosed by a portico on the south, west and north, supported by 14 columns and 2 engaged columns.

A large triclinium opened off the west portico and had a view of the garden.

See Jashemski, W. F., 1993. The Gardens of Pompeii, Volume II: Appendices. New York: Caratzas. (p.165, and plan)

 

The large peristyle garden on the lowest level was surrounded by a portico supported by 40 pillars. 

According to Mazois, the portico was enclosed with glass windows. 

In the middle of the garden there was a rectangular pool with a semicircular projection on the west. 

The marble fountain statuette of a boy with a goose (now in Naples Museum, inventory number 6111) reported as being from this house would have been a garden decoration.

See Jashemski, W. F., 1993. The Gardens of Pompeii, Volume II: Appendices. New York: Caratzas. (p.165, and plan)

PAH, vol 1, pt 1, p.301 (Nov 8 1778)