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VI.16.35 Pompeii. House. Excavated 1904.

 

VI.16.35 Pompeii. December 2007. Looking east to entrance doorway. According to NdS, this doorway had brick door-jambs and threshold of travertine. The threshold had holes for the fitting in of the wooden doorframe. The entrance corridor or fauces A, had a floor of Opus signinum with pieces of inlaid marble, and was slightly inclined to the roadway. The walls were coated with a high marble dado with a black background, and inlaid with imitation white marble-like slabs obtained by a white background with red and black fillets. See Notizie degli Scavi, 1908, (p.359-363)

VI.16.35 Pompeii. December 2007. Looking east to entrance doorway.

According to NdS, this doorway had brick door-jambs and threshold of travertine.

The threshold had holes for the fitting in of the wooden doorframe.

The entrance corridor or fauces A, had a floor of Opus signinum with pieces of inlaid marble, and was slightly inclined to the roadway.

The walls were coated with a high marble dado with a black background, and inlaid with imitation white marble-like slabs obtained by a white background with red and black fillets.

See Notizie degli Scavi, 1908, (p.359-363)

 

VI.16.35 Pompeii. December 2007.  Looking east from entrance doorway across fauces A towards atrium B, towards small corridor G leading to rear rooms. The rise in the floor of the corridor in the centre of the photo, would be the remains of the steps. On the right, on the east side of the atrium, the small tablinum can be seen.

According to NdS, the small atrium B was bare-walled and the floor was Opus signinum.
At the time of excavation it was noted for its impluvium “a”. This had a very high edge, faced with cocciopesto which had some pieces of encrusted marble in the upper horizontal surface. Running around the inside part was a decoration of  lines of yellow stucco in relief, and in each of the four corners, small palms, also in relief. The background consisted of a large disc of white marble and around it pieces of marble of various colours. The walls of the atrium were decorated with simple white plaster, the floor was of cocciopesto and formed a continuation with the floor of the fauces. At the extreme right of the northern wall of the atrium were three steps in masonry, plaster coated. Following these, a staircase also in masonry recessed between rooms E and H, leading to the upper floor.

On the east side of atrium B opened the full-width tablinum C. It had bare walls and its floor was Opus signinum, similar to the atrium and fauces. The left jamb would have been of wood, and it corresponded on the right with a brick pilaster. In the east wall of the tablinum would have been a wide window which would have had a wooden window-sill. This window gave light into room F, which was all faced with cocciopesto.

On the west side of the atrium was a doorway into room D, this doorway had wooden jambs and a threshold of masonry forming a step. The room did not provide anything notable, it had cocciopesto flooring and walls with a white background divided by red lines into large panels. In the west wall was a window overlooking Vicolo dei Vettii. 

On the north side of the atrium was a doorway which was to the left of the aforementioned stairs, this led into room E. The doorway had wooden jambs and it seemed also, a threshold of wood. The rectangular room had a floor of cocciopesto and walls with a high plinth of brick plaster. In the south wall a small window protruded into the atrium.

Room G was a rather narrow corridor, whose entrance from the atrium had a wooden threshold. In its eastern half it was only separated from room F by a low wall. In the corner of this low wall and the east wall, the mouth of a tank made of terracotta, covered in robust masonry was found, “b”.

Room H opened from the north side of corridor G, its doorway had a lava threshold and originally would have had wooden door-jambs. This room did not offer any other decoration other than the usual brick plaster plinth on the walls, and floor of cocciopesto. A pile of lime was in the north-west corner.  To the right of the doorway in the south wall, was a window into corridor G, and in the west wall was a room under the stairs. This room was transformed into an apotheca, as proved by the holes for the shelving supports. See Notizie degli Scavi, 1908, (p.359-363)

VI.16.35 Pompeii. December 2007.

Looking east from entrance doorway across fauces A towards atrium B, towards small corridor G leading to rear rooms.

The rise in the floor of the corridor in the centre of the photo, would be the remains of the steps.

On the right, on the east side of the atrium, the small tablinum can be seen.

 

IV.16.35 Pompeii. May 2010. Rear room, kitchen I, on the east side. Looking west from VI.16.11. The doorway into the kitchen from the corridor is in the rear (west) wall on the left of the picture. Sogliano’s description was written as arriving into the kitchen from this corridor. Our picture was taken from the other side of the room.
According to NdS, corridor G turned at right-angle to the north, and then again at right-angle to the east, where it immediately opened into the kitchen, room I.
The hearth “c” leaned to the left end of the east wall, (right front of this photo).
It had roof tiles on its edge and an arched empty space below.
Perpendicular to the south wall were two parallel walls, which formed two small rooms, (area on the left of this photo).
Room “d” was the latrine.
Room “e” was a repository.
See Notizie degli Scavi di Antichità, 1908, (p.359-363)

IV.16.35 Pompeii. May 2010. Rear room, kitchen I, on the east side. Looking west from VI.16.11.

The doorway into the kitchen from the corridor is in the rear (west) wall on the left of the picture.

Sogliano’s description was written as arriving into the kitchen from this corridor.

Our picture is taken from the other side of the room.

According to NdS, corridor G turned at right-angle to the north, and then again at right-angle to the east, where it immediately opened into the kitchen, room I.

The hearth “c” leaned to the left end of the east wall, (right front of this photo).

It had roof tiles on its edge and an arched empty space below.

Perpendicular to the south wall were two parallel walls, which formed two small rooms, (area on the left of this photo).

Room “d” was the latrine.

Room “e” was a repository.

See Notizie degli Scavi di Antichità, 1908, (p.359-363)

 

IV.16.35 Pompeii. 1908 NdS excavation plan of house. See Notizie degli Scavi di Antichità, 1908, p. 360, fig. 1.

IV.16.35 Pompeii. 1908 NdS excavation plan of house.

See Notizie degli Scavi di Antichità, 1908, p. 360, fig. 1.

According to NdS:

 

The entrance doorway 35 had brick door-jambs and threshold of travertine.

The threshold had holes for the fitting in of the wooden doorframe.

 

Fauces A, the entrance corridor, had a floor of Opus signinum with pieces of inlaid marble, and was slightly inclined to the roadway.

The walls were coated with a high marble dado with a black background, and inlaid with imitation white marble-like slabs obtained by a white background with red and black fillets.

 

Atrium B was small with bare walls and the floor was Opus signinum.

At the time of excavation it was noted for its impluvium (a).

This had a very high edge, faced with cocciopesto which had some pieces of encrusted marble in the upper horizontal surface.

Running around the inside part was a decoration of lines of yellow stucco in relief, and in each of the four corners, small palms, also in relief.

The background consisted of a large disc of white marble and around it pieces of marble of various colours.

The walls of the atrium were decorated with simple white plaster, the floor was of cocciopesto and formed a continuation with the floor of the fauces.

At the extreme right of the northern wall of the atrium were three steps in masonry, plaster coated.

Following these a staircase also in masonry recessed between rooms E and H, leading to the upper floor.

 

Tablinum C was on the east side of atrium B and opened the full-width.

It had bare walls and its floor was Opus signinum, similar to the atrium and fauces.

The left jamb would have been of wood, and it corresponded on the right with a brick pilaster.
In the east wall of the tablinum would have been a wide window which would have had a wooden window-sill.

 

Room D was on the west side of the atrium.

The doorway had wooden jambs and a threshold of masonry forming a step.

The room did not provide anything of note.

It had cocciopesto flooring and walls with a white background divided into large panels by red lines.

In the west wall was a window overlooking Vicolo dei Vettii.

 

The doorway to room E was on the north side of the atrium to the left of the aforementioned stairs.

The doorway had wooden jambs and it seemed also, a threshold of wood.

The rectangular room had a floor of cocciopesto and walls with a high dado (intonaco laterizio).

In the south wall a small window protruded into the atrium.

 

Room F was to the east of (behind) the tablinum C.

It was all faced with cocciopesto.

The window in the west wall gave light from the tablinum into room F.

 

Room G was a rather narrow corridor, whose entrance from the atrium had a wooden threshold.

In its eastern half it was only separated from room F by a low wall.

In the corner of this low wall and the east wall, the mouth of a tank (b) made of terracotta, covered in robust masonry was found.

 

Room H opened from the north side of corridor G.

Its doorway had a lava threshold and originally would have had wooden door-jambs.

This room did not offer any other decoration other than the usual dado (laterizio) on the walls, and floor of cocciopesto.

A pile of lime was in the north-west corner.

To the right of the doorway in the south wall, was a window into corridor G, and in the west wall was a room under the stairs.

This room was transformed into an apotheca, as proved by the holes for the shelving supports.

 

Room I, was a kitchen, at the rear, on the east side of the house.

According to NdS, corridor G turned at right-angle to the north, and then again at right-angle to the east, where it immediately opened into the kitchen, room I.

The hearth (c) leaned to the left end of the east wall.

It had roof tiles on its edge and an arched empty space below.

Perpendicular to the south wall were two parallel walls, which formed two small rooms, latrine (d) and a repository (e).

 

See Notizie degli Scavi di Antichità, 1908, (p.359-363)

 

 

 

 

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Ultimo aggiornamento - Last updated: 22-Oct-2018 14:43