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VI.2.29 Pompeii. Small house. Excavated 1812?

 

VI.2.29 Pompeii. September 2005. Bench outside on south side of entrance doorway.

VI.2.29 Pompeii. September 2005. Bench outside on south side of entrance doorway.

 

VI.2.29 Pompeii. May 2011.

Looking north along Vicolo di Modesto from outside entrance doorway, on left.

 

VI.2.29 Pompeii. September 2005. Entrance doorway.

VI.2.29 Pompeii. September 2005. Entrance doorway.

 

VI.2.29 Pompeii. May 2011. Steps against east wall, on south side of entrance doorway.

VI.2.29 Pompeii. May 2011. Steps against east wall, on south side of entrance doorway.

 

VI.2.29 Pompeii. September 2005. Looking south to steps to upper floor, immediately to south of entrance doorway.

VI.2.29 Pompeii. September 2005.

Looking south to steps to upper floor, immediately to south of entrance doorway.

 

VI.2.29 Pompeii. September 2005. Looking west from entrance doorway along corridor to rear. According to Fiorelli, there was a lararium in the long corridor. See Pappalardo, U., 2001. La Descrizione di Pompei per Giuseppe Fiorelli (1875). Napoli: Massa Editore. (p.52)
According to Boyce, in the north wall of the corridor is a niche with peaked ceiling formed by two tiles set at an obtuse angle. Fiorelli referred to it as larario. See Boyce G. K., 1937. Corpus of the Lararia of Pompeii. Rome: MAAR 14. (p.44, no.144)

VI.2.29 Pompeii. September 2005. Looking west from entrance doorway, along corridor to rear.

According to Fiorelli, there was a lararium in the long corridor.

See Pappalardo, U., 2001. La Descrizione di Pompei per Giuseppe Fiorelli (1875). Napoli: Massa Editore. (p.52)

According to Boyce, in the north wall of the corridor is a niche with peaked ceiling formed by two tiles set at an obtuse angle.

Fiorelli referred to it as larario.

See Boyce G. K., 1937. Corpus of the Lararia of Pompeii. Rome: MAAR 14. (p.44, no.144)

 

VI.2.29 Pompeii, in top right corner. Viewed from the model in the Naples Archaeological Museum.
According to Dyer: “This small house in the Vicolo di Modesto had neither atrium nor peristyle; but in order to enable the family to enjoy the fresh air which the richer classes obtained in those courts, a stone bench ran along the front of the house. The street door by the side of it opened into a sort of covered hall. On the left some stairs led to an upper storey, behind which there was a small room apparently for the slave. On the right hand side was an uncovered passage, with a well at the end of it, running along the greater part of the house; on the left of which is what appeared to have been a workshop, with a doorway from the entrance hall and lit by small windows from the uncovered passage. This room was followed by a dining-room entered by a doorway from the same passage, and behind this again, quite at the furthest extremity of the house, a kitchen, as may be recognised by the hearth. The sleeping rooms must have been upon the upper floor.”
See Dyer, T., 1867. The Ruins of Pompeii. London: Bell and Daldy. (p.74)

VI.2.29 Pompeii, in top right corner.

Viewed from the model in the Naples Archaeological Museum.

According to Dyer:

“This small house in the Vicolo di Modesto had neither atrium nor peristyle; but in order to enable the family to enjoy the fresh air which the richer classes obtained in those courts, a stone bench ran along the front of the house.

The street door by the side of it opened into a sort of covered hall.

On the left some stairs led to an upper storey, behind which there was a small room apparently for the slave.

On the right hand side was an uncovered passage, with a well at the end of it, running along the greater part of the house; on the left of which is what appeared to have been a workshop, with a doorway from the entrance hall and lit by small windows from the uncovered passage.

This room was followed by a dining-room entered by a doorway from the same passage, and behind this again, quite at the furthest extremity of the house, a kitchen, as may be recognised by the hearth.

The sleeping rooms must have been upon the upper floor.”

See Dyer, T., 1867. The Ruins of Pompeii. London: Bell and Daldy. (p.74)