PompeiiinPictures

  

 

 

 

Back
Home
Up
Next




VI.2.29 Pompeii. Small house. Excavated 1812?

 

According to Fiorelli –

VI.2.29. “Un intonaco rosso, con riquadrature bianche e gialle, designa i confini di altra abitazione, la cui porta e fiancheggiata sulla via da un poggio di fabbrica. Oltre il piano superiore, essa era formata di tre o quattro stanze terrene, che non bene si distinguono perche in parte cadute, di un lungo corridoio con larario, e della cucina preceduta da breve area illuminata dall’alto, contenente un impluvio circondato di fiori, per raccogliervi le acque cadenti del tetto.”

See Fiorelli, G: Descrizione di Pompei, (p.91)

See Pappalardo, U., 2001. La Descrizione di Pompei per Giuseppe Fiorelli (1875). Napoli: Massa Editore. (p.52)

(translation –the decoration on the front of this house was of yellow and white painted panels on a red background, at the side of the doorway and along the roadway was a masonry bench. Other than the upper floor, it consisted of three or four ground floor rooms that were not well distinguished because the walls had partly fallen, of a long corridor with a lararium, and of a kitchen preceded by a short area lit from above, containing an impluvium surrounded by flowers, to collect the rainwater that fell from the roof.)

 

VI.2.29 Pompeii. September 2005. Bench outside on south side of entrance doorway.

VI.2.29 Pompeii. September 2005. Bench outside on south side of entrance doorway.

 

VI.2.29 Pompeii. May 2011.

Looking north along Vicolo di Modesto from outside entrance doorway, on left.

 

VI.2.29 Pompeii. September 2005. Entrance doorway.

VI.2.29 Pompeii. September 2005. Entrance doorway.

 

VI.2.29 Pompeii. May 2011. Steps against east wall, on south side of entrance doorway.

VI.2.29 Pompeii. May 2011. Steps against east wall, on south side of entrance doorway.

 

VI.2.29 Pompeii. September 2005. Looking south to steps to upper floor, immediately to south of entrance doorway.

VI.2.29 Pompeii. September 2005.

Looking south to steps to upper floor, immediately to south of entrance doorway.

 

VI.2.29 Pompeii. September 2005. Looking west from entrance doorway along corridor to rear. According to Fiorelli, there was a lararium in the long corridor. See Pappalardo, U., 2001. La Descrizione di Pompei per Giuseppe Fiorelli (1875). Napoli: Massa Editore. (p.52)
According to Boyce, in the north wall of the corridor is a niche with peaked ceiling formed by two tiles set at an obtuse angle. Fiorelli referred to it as larario. See Boyce G. K., 1937. Corpus of the Lararia of Pompeii. Rome: MAAR 14. (p.44, no.144)

VI.2.29 Pompeii. September 2005. Looking west from entrance doorway, along corridor to rear.

According to Fiorelli, there was a lararium in the long corridor.

See Pappalardo, U., 2001. La Descrizione di Pompei per Giuseppe Fiorelli (1875). Napoli: Massa Editore. (p.52)

According to Boyce, in the north wall of the corridor is a niche with peaked ceiling formed by two tiles set at an obtuse angle.

Fiorelli referred to it as larario.

See Boyce G. K., 1937. Corpus of the Lararia of Pompeii. Rome: MAAR 14. (p.44, no.144)

 

VI.2.29 Pompeii, in top right corner. Viewed from the model in the Naples Archaeological Museum.
According to Dyer: “This small house in the Vicolo di Modesto had neither atrium nor peristyle; but in order to enable the family to enjoy the fresh air which the richer classes obtained in those courts, a stone bench ran along the front of the house. The street door by the side of it opened into a sort of covered hall. On the left some stairs led to an upper storey, behind which there was a small room apparently for the slave. On the right hand side was an uncovered passage, with a well at the end of it, running along the greater part of the house; on the left of which is what appeared to have been a workshop, with a doorway from the entrance hall and lit by small windows from the uncovered passage. This room was followed by a dining-room entered by a doorway from the same passage, and behind this again, quite at the furthest extremity of the house, a kitchen, as may be recognised by the hearth. The sleeping rooms must have been upon the upper floor.”
See Dyer, T., 1867. The Ruins of Pompeii. London: Bell and Daldy. (p.74)

VI.2.29 Pompeii, in top right corner.

Viewed from the model in the Naples Archaeological Museum.

According to Dyer:

“This small house in the Vicolo di Modesto had neither atrium nor peristyle; but in order to enable the family to enjoy the fresh air which the richer classes obtained in those courts, a stone bench ran along the front of the house.

The street door by the side of it opened into a sort of covered hall.

On the left some stairs led to an upper storey, behind which there was a small room apparently for the slave.

On the right hand side was an uncovered passage, with a well at the end of it, running along the greater part of the house; on the left of which is what appeared to have been a workshop, with a doorway from the entrance hall and lit by small windows from the uncovered passage.

This room was followed by a dining-room entered by a doorway from the same passage, and behind this again, quite at the furthest extremity of the house, a kitchen, as may be recognised by the hearth.

The sleeping rooms must have been upon the upper floor.”

See Dyer, T., 1867. The Ruins of Pompeii. London: Bell and Daldy. (p.74)

 

VI.2.29 Pompeii. 1824 drawing by Mazois showing plan of house.
According to Mazois, this house would have been lived in by a citizen probably with a modest income, or a professional working from home, as there was neither a shop nor a place for any kind of work. 
The house was in a small roadway; at the side of the doorway was a masonry bench, where the family could sit during the evening in the good weather taking the fresh air, as this house did not have a courtyard. 
•	At the entrance was a small vestibule (1),
•	A room for a servant or slave (2),
•	Stairs (3),
•	A reception room (4), being lit by the three small openings in the passageways (5) and (7),
•	Passageway (7) leading to the dining room (6).
•	The kitchen (8) is recognisable by its bench and the tank (9), where one washed the dishes; in the passage was the well (7), where the opening was none other than a terracotta pot without depth.
•	Above these rooms were the bedrooms and the dwelling of the family.
See Mazois, F., 1824. Les Ruines de Pompei: Second Partie. Paris: Firmin Didot. (p.45-6, Pl IX. fig. II).

VI.2.29 Pompeii. 1824 drawing by Mazois showing plan of house.

According to Mazois, this house would have been lived in by a citizen probably with a modest income, or a professional working from home, as there was neither a shop nor a place for any kind of work.

The house was in a small roadway; at the side of the doorway was a masonry bench, where the family could sit during the evening in the good weather taking the fresh air, as this house did not have a courtyard.

  • At the entrance was a small vestibule (1),
  • A room for a servant or slave (2),
  • Stairs (3),
  • A reception room (4), being lit by the three small openings in the passageways (5) and (7),
  • Passageway (7) leading to the dining room (6).
  • The kitchen (8) is recognisable by its bench and the tank (9), where one washed the dishes; in the passage was the well (7), where the opening was none other than a terracotta pot without depth.
  • Above these rooms were the bedrooms and the dwelling of the family.

See Mazois, F., 1824. Les Ruines de Pompei: Second Partie. Paris: Firmin Didot. (p.45-6, Pl IX. fig. II).