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VI.2.4 Pompeii. Casa di Sallustio or House of Sallust or Domus A. Cossius Libanus.

Excavated 1805 to 1809, 1969 to 1971, 2005 to 2007 and 2010.

Bombed 1943. Restored 1970.

Part 1.                                          Part 2

 

Part 3      Part 4      Part 5      Part 6      Plan (Opens in separate window)

 

VI.2.4 Pompeii. May 2006. Entrance.
According to Breton, on either side of the entrance doorway were two pilasters surmounted with sculptured grey lava capitals. He could see one of them, which represented a Satyr teaching a young Faun to play the pipes. Today, all had disappeared. See Breton, Ernest. 1870. Pompeia, Guide de visite a Pompei, 3rd ed. Paris, Guerin. 

According to Della Corte, this house was originally attributed to Caius Sallustius, who was nominated for election in the inscription on the exterior house wall, no longer visible.
Originally the beautiful and noble house would have been in the hands of an old established Pompeian family, who must remain unknown. By 79AD, it was transformed into one of the biggest hospitiums or hotel in Pompeii. The owner was then more likely to be A. Cossius Libanus, a man possibly of oriental descent, whose bronze seal was found in the house in September 1806.  It read - A. Coss(ius) liban(us)  (S.33 or CIL X 8058,27) See Della Corte, M., 1965.  Case ed Abitanti di Pompei. Napoli: Fausto Fiorentino. (p.38)

According to Epigraphik-Datenbank Clauss/Slaby (See www.manfredclauss.de) the electoral recommendation read - 

C(aium) Sallustium       [CIL IV 104]

VI.2.4 Pompeii. May 2006. Entrance.

According to Breton, on either side of the entrance doorway were two pilasters surmounted with sculptured grey lava capitals.

He could see one of them, which represented a Satyr teaching a young Faun to play the pipes. Today, all had disappeared.

See Breton, Ernest. 1870. Pompeia, Guide de visite a Pompei, 3rd ed. Paris, Guerin.

 

According to Della Corte, this house was originally attributed to Caius Sallustius, who was nominated for election in the inscription on the exterior house wall, no longer visible.

Originally the beautiful and noble house would have been in the hands of an old established Pompeian family, who must remain unknown.

By 79AD, it was transformed into one of the biggest hospitiums or hotel in Pompeii. 

The owner was then more likely to be A. Cossius Libanus, a man possibly of oriental descent, whose bronze seal was found in the house in September 1806.

 It read - A. Coss(ius) liban(us)  (S.33 or CIL X 8058,27)

See Della Corte, M., 1965.  Case ed Abitanti di Pompei. Napoli: Fausto Fiorentino. (p.38)

 

According to Epigraphik-Datenbank Clauss/Slaby (See www.manfredclauss.de) the electoral recommendation read -

 

C(aium) Sallustium       [CIL IV 104]

 

VI.2.4 Pompeii. About 1870. Entrance, in centre, with VI.2.5 on the left, and VI.2.3, on the right. Photo courtesy of Rick Bauer.

VI.2.4 Pompeii. About 1870. Entrance, in centre, with VI.2.5 on the left, and VI.2.3, on the right.

Photo courtesy of Rick Bauer.

 

VI.2.4 Pompeii. December 2007. Looking east into VI.2.5, and entrance to atrium.

VI.2.4 Pompeii. December 2007. Looking east into VI.2.5, and entrance to atrium.

 

VI.2.4 Pompeii. Old undated photograph of 1870s. Entrance looking into atrium. Courtesy of Society of Antiquaries. Fox Collection.

VI.2.4 Pompeii. Old undated photograph of 1870s. Entrance looking into atrium.

Courtesy of Society of Antiquaries. Fox Collection.

 

VI.2.4 Pompeii. May 2010. Layout of house as shown in cork model in Naples Museum.

VI.2.4 Pompeii. May 2010. Layout of house as shown in cork model in Naples Museum.

 

VI.2.4 Pompeii. September 2004. Looking east across atrium and impluvium.
Apart from the west side, the house was entirely destroyed by the bombing during the night of 14/15th September 1943.  According to Laidlaw, the roof, the south apartment, and the portico behind the main house block are almost completely modern reconstructions made in 1970-71. See Garcia y Garcia, L., 2006. Danni di guerra a Pompei. Rome: L’Erma di Bretschneider. (p. 66-74)

VI.2.4 Pompeii. September 2004. Looking east across atrium and impluvium.

Apart from the west side, the house was entirely destroyed by the bombing during the night of 14/15th September 1943.

According to Laidlaw, the roof, the south apartment, and the portico behind the main house block are almost completely modern reconstructions made in 1970-71.

See Garcia y Garcia, L., 2006. Danni di guerra a Pompei. Rome: L’Erma di Bretschneider. (p. 66-74)

 

VI.2.4 Pompeii. Hercules conquering the Stag of Cerinea, found on east side of impluvium. According to Anne Laidlaw, some of the major finds made during the first official excavation, in February of 1805 in front of Queen Maria Carolina, the Bourbon queen, were taken by her to Palermo when the French took over in March of 1806 under Napoleon, and now are in the Palermo Regional Archaeological Museum. The most striking was a large bronze fountain group of Hercules and the Stag, which was found at the back of the impluvium on a pedestal. All that you can see now in the impluvium margin are some sockets which either were for the waterworks or for the pedestal. 
Recent measurements of the pedestal and basin carried out for her in Palermo, were checked against the sockets in the impluvium margin in Sallust, and came out perfectly.
This would confirm the statue came from VI.2.4 and not Torre del Greco as shown on the museum card. Now in Palermo Regional Archaeological Museum. Inventory number 8364 or 8634. According to Breton, on a base of marble in the centre of the impluvium, was found a bronze group representing Hercules conquering the stag, from the mouth of which flowed a jet of water. This group is now in the Museum of Palermo, and a copy in plaster in the Museum at Naples. See Breton, Ernest. 1870. Pompeia, Guide de visite a Pompei, 3rd ed. Paris, Guerin.  See Pagano, M. and Prisciandaro, R., 2006. Studio sulle provenienze degli oggetti rinvenuti negli scavi borbonici del regno di Napoli.  Naples : Nicola Longobardi. (p.95, dated 5 Feb 1805). See Pagano, M., 1997. I Diari di Scavo di Pompeii, Ercolano e Stabiae di Francesco e Pietro la Vega (1764-1810.) Rome: L'Erma di Bretschneider. (p. 168). Photograph courtesy of Giovanni dall’Orto: Wikimedia creative commons.

VI.2.4 Pompeii. Hercules conquering the Stag of Cerinea, found on east side of impluvium.

According to Anne Laidlaw, some of the major finds made during the first official excavation, in February of 1805 in front of Queen Maria Carolina, the Bourbon queen, were taken by her to Palermo when the French took over in March of 1806 under Napoleon, and now are in the Palermo Regional Archaeological Museum.

The most striking was a large bronze fountain group of Hercules and the Stag, which was found at the back of the impluvium on a pedestal.

All that you can see now in the impluvium margin are some sockets which either were for the waterworks or for the pedestal.

Recent measurements of the pedestal and basin carried out for her in Palermo, were checked against the sockets in the impluvium margin in Sallust, and came out perfectly.

This would confirm the statue came from VI.2.4 and not Torre del Greco as shown on the museum card.

Now in Palermo Regional Archaeological Museum. Inventory number 8364 or 8634.

According to Breton, on a base of marble in the centre of the impluvium, was found a bronze group representing Hercules conquering the stag, from the mouth of which flowed a jet of water.

This group is now in the Museum of Palermo, and a copy in plaster in the Museum at Naples.

See Breton, Ernest. 1870. Pompeia, Guide de visite a Pompei, 3rd ed. Paris, Guerin.

See Pagano, M. and Prisciandaro, R., 2006. Studio sulle provenienze degli oggetti rinvenuti negli scavi borbonici del regno di Napoli.  Naples : Nicola Longobardi. (p.95, dated 5 Feb 1805).

See Pagano, M., 1997. I Diari di Scavo di Pompeii, Ercolano e Stabiae di Francesco e Pietro la Vega (1764-1810.) Rome: L'Erma di Bretschneider. (p. 168).

Photograph courtesy of Giovanni dall’Orto: Wikimedia creative commons.

 

VI.2.4 Pompeii. May 2010. Looking west from rear of atrium across impluvium towards entrance, centre. The doorway to VI.2.3 is on the left of it, and to VI.2.5 is on the right of it. Photo courtesy of Rick Bauer.

VI.2.4 Pompeii. May 2010. Looking west from rear of atrium across impluvium towards entrance, centre.

The doorway to VI.2.3 is on the left of it, and to VI.2.5 is on the right of it.

Photo courtesy of Rick Bauer.

 

VI.2.4 Pompeii. June 2010. Looking north towards counter of VI.2.5 taken from entrance corridor. Photo courtesy of Rick Bauer.

VI.2.4 Pompeii. June 2010. Looking north towards counter of VI.2.5, taken from entrance corridor.

Photo courtesy of Rick Bauer.

 

VI.2.4 Pompeii. Old undated photograph of 1870s. Rooms to north of atrium, looking past VI.2.5 in foreground. Courtesy of Society of Antiquaries. Fox Collection.

VI.2.4 Pompeii. Old undated photograph of 1870s.

Rooms to north of atrium, looking past VI.2.5 in foreground.

Courtesy of Society of Antiquaries. Fox Collection.

 

VI.2.4 Pompeii. June 2010. North side of atrium, looking west. Photo courtesy of Rick Bauer. On the left is the entrance to VI.2.5, then the doorway leading to the anteroom of the winter triclinium, see below.
In the centre and on the right, are two doorways to cubicula.

VI.2.4 Pompeii. June 2010. North side of atrium, looking west. Photo courtesy of Rick Bauer.

On the left is the entrance to VI.2.5, then the doorway leading to the anteroom of the winter triclinium, see below.

In the centre and on the right, are two doorways to cubicula.

 

VI.2.4 Pompeii. Old undated photograph of 1870s. Winter Triclinium. Courtesy of Society of Antiquaries. Fox Collection.

VI.2.4 Pompeii. Old undated photograph of 1870s. Winter Triclinium.

Courtesy of Society of Antiquaries. Fox Collection.

 

VI.2.4 Pompeii. September 2004. Looking north-east across north side of atrium.  The doorway on the left leads to the anteroom of the winter triclinium.  Next to it are two cubicula, and then the north ala.

VI.2.4 Pompeii. September 2004. Looking north-east across north side of atrium.

The doorway on the left leads to the anteroom of the winter triclinium.

Next to it are two cubicula, and then the north ala.

 

VI.2.4 Pompeii. 1882. Reconstruction painting of walls and doorways in atrium. See Mau, A. 1882. Geschichte der Decorativen Wandmalerei in Pompeji. Berlin: Reimer. (p. 20, Taf II).

VI.2.4 Pompeii. 1882. Reconstruction painting of walls and doorways in atrium.

See Mau, A. 1882. Geschichte der Decorativen Wandmalerei in Pompeji. Berlin: Reimer. (p. 20, Taf II).

 

VI.2.4 Pompeii. 1824, Cross section drawing of house, looking north. See Mazois, F., 1824. Les Ruines de Pompei: Second Partie. Paris: Firmin Didot. (Pl. 36,1).

VI.2.4 Pompeii. 1824, Cross section drawing of house, looking north.

See Mazois, F., 1824. Les Ruines de Pompei: Second Partie. Paris: Firmin Didot. (Pl. 36,1).

 

VI.2.4 Pompeii. May 2010. Looking east across atrium. Photo courtesy of Rick Bauer. Apart from the west side, the house was entirely destroyed by the bombing during the night of 14/15th September 1943. The roof, the south apartment, and the portico behind the main house block are almost completely modern reconstructions made in 1970-71. See Garcia y Garcia, L., 2006. Danni di guerra a Pompei. Rome: L’Erma di Bretschneider. (p. 66-74)

VI.2.4 Pompeii. May 2010. Looking east across atrium towards tablinum.

On the left can be seen the north ala, on the east wall of which are the remains of a lararium painting.

Below the site of the painting can be seen holes in the wall.  Photo courtesy of Rick Bauer.

 

 

Part 2

 

Part 3      Part 4      Part 5      Part 6      Plan (Opens in separate window)