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II.6 Pompeii. Anfiteatro or Amphitheatre.

First excavations 1748, then abandoned.

Completely excavated between 1813 and 1816.

 

Part:       1        2        3         4        5        6        7_

 

II.6 Pompeii. December 2006. Arena and seating of Amphitheatre, looking south along west side.

II.6 Pompeii. December 2006. Arena and seating of Amphitheatre, looking south along west side.

 

II.6 Pompeii. June 2012. Looking west across arena of Amphitheatre. Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

II.6 Pompeii. June 2012. Looking west across arena of Amphitheatre. Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

 

II.6 Pompeii. December 2006. Arena and seating of Amphitheatre, looking west.

II.6 Pompeii. December 2006. Arena and seating of Amphitheatre, looking west.

 

II.6 Pompeii. December 2006. Arena and seating, west side. Showing doorway to tunnel leading from arena floor to outside the Amphitheatre.

II.6 Pompeii. December 2006. Arena and seating, west side.

Showing doorway to tunnel leading from arena floor to outside the Amphitheatre. 

 

II.6 Pompeii. May 2016. Arena, west side. 
Showing doorway to tunnel leading from arena floor to outside the Amphitheatre.  
According to Mau, this would have been the corridor for removing the bodies of the dead.
Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

II.6 Pompeii. May 2016. Arena, west side.

Showing doorway to tunnel leading from arena floor to outside the Amphitheatre. 

According to Mau, this would have been the corridor for removing the bodies of the dead.

Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

 

II.6 Pompeii. May 2016. Looking west from arena into tunnel leading to outside of the Amphitheatre. 
Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

II.6 Pompeii. May 2016. Looking west from arena into tunnel leading to outside of the Amphitheatre.

Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

 

II.6 Pompeii. June 2012. Looking west from arena into tunnel leading to outside of the Ampitheatre. Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

II.6 Pompeii. June 2012. Looking west from arena into tunnel leading to outside of the Amphitheatre.

Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

 

II.6 Pompeii. December 2006. Tunnel leading from arena floor to outside the Amphitheatre. According to Mau, this narrow and low passageway was the gruesome corridor where the bodies of the dead were taken. They were removed from the arena and dragged by means of hooks, its entrance was the Porta Libitinensis, “Death Gate”. On the right can be seen a doorway to another dark room, possibly a storeroom in the corridor. At the far end is a doorway in the exterior west wall of the Ampitheatre. See Mau, A., 1907, translated by Kelsey, F. W., Pompeii: Its Life and Art. New York: Macmillan. (p. 215).

II.6 Pompeii. December 2006. Tunnel leading from arena floor to outside the Amphitheatre. 

According to Mau, this narrow and low passageway was the gruesome corridor where the bodies of the dead were taken.

They were removed from the arena and dragged by means of hooks, its entrance was the Porta Libitinensis, “Death Gate”.

On the right can be seen a doorway to another dark room, possibly a storeroom in the corridor.

At the far end is a doorway in the exterior west wall of the Amphitheatre.

See Mau, A., 1907, translated by Kelsey, F. W., Pompeii: Its Life and Art. New York: Macmillan. (p. 215).

 

II.6 Pompeii. May 2016. Steps in tunnel leading from arena floor to outside the Amphitheatre.   
Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

II.6 Pompeii. May 2016. Steps in tunnel leading from arena floor to outside the Amphitheatre.  

Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

 

II.6 Pompeii. December 2006. Steps in tunnel leading from arena floor to outside the Amphitheatre.

II.6 Pompeii. December 2006. 

Steps in tunnel leading from arena floor to outside the Amphitheatre.  

 

II.6 Pompeii. June 2012. Looking north-west across arena of Amphitheatre. Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

II.6 Pompeii. June 2012. Looking north-west across arena of Amphitheatre.

Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

 

II.6 Pompeii. June 2012. Looking north-west across area and towards entrance at north end of Amphitheatre. Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

II.6 Pompeii. June 2012.

Looking north-west across area and towards entrance at north end of Amphitheatre.

Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

 

II.6 Pompeii. December 2006. Exit to the south-west from Amphitheatre, looking south.

II.6 Pompeii. December 2006. Exit to the south-west from Amphitheatre, looking south.

 

II.6 Pompeii. May 2016. Corridor under Amphitheatre, south-east side leading north-east, under restoration. Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

II.6 Pompeii. May 2016. Corridor under Amphitheatre, south-east side leading north-east, under restoration.

Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

 

II.6 Pompeii. September 2015. Corridor under Amphitheatre, south-east side leading north-east.

II.6 Pompeii. September 2015. Corridor under Amphitheatre, south-east side leading north-east.

 

II.6 Pompeii. September 2015. Corridor under Amphitheatre, looking towards south wall of south-east side leading north-east.

II.6 Pompeii. September 2015.

Corridor under Amphitheatre, looking towards south wall of south-east side leading north-east.

 

II.6 Pompeii. June 2012. Corridor under Amphitheatre, south-east side leading north-east.
Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

II.6 Pompeii. June 2012. Corridor under Amphitheatre, south-east side leading north-east.

Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

 

II.6 Pompeii. December 2006. Corridor under Amphitheatre, east side leading north-east.

II.6 Pompeii. December 2006. Corridor under Amphitheatre, south-east side leading north-east.

 

II.6 Pompeii. December 2006. Corridor under Amphitheatre, east side.

II.6 Pompeii. December 2006. Corridor under Amphitheatre, east side.

 

II.6 Pompeii. May 2016. Corridor under Amphitheatre, south-west side, leading north-west, under renovation. Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

II.6 Pompeii. May 2016. Corridor under Amphitheatre, south-west side, leading north-west, under renovation.

Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

 

II.6 Pompeii. September 2015. Corridor under Amphitheatre, south-west side, leading north-west.

II.6 Pompeii. September 2015. Corridor under Amphitheatre, south-west side, leading north-west.

 

II.6 Pompeii. September 2015. Corridor under Amphitheatre, looking towards south wall of south-west side, leading north-west.

II.6 Pompeii. September 2015.

Corridor under Amphitheatre, looking towards south wall of south-west side, leading north-west.

 

II.6 Pompeii. June 2012. Corridor under Amphitheatre, south-west side, leading north-west.
Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

II.6 Pompeii. June 2012. Corridor under Amphitheatre, south-west side, leading north-west.

Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

 

II.6 Pompeii. December 2006. Corridor under Amphitheatre, west side, leading north-west.

II.6 Pompeii. December 2006. Corridor under Amphitheatre, south-west side, leading north-west.

 

II.6 Pompeii. December 2006. Plaque now fixed to east  wall of exit from the Amphitheatre, leading south-west.  It read -
C. QVINCTIVS C. F. VALGVS
M. PORCIVS M. F[ilius]. DVO VIR.
QVINQ[uennales] COLONIAI HONORIS
CAUSSA SPECTACVLA DE SVA
PEQ[unia] FAC[iunda] COER[arunt] ET COLONEIS
LOCVM IN PERPETVOM DEDER[unt]              [CIL X 852]
Plaque recording:
“Caius Quinctius Valgus, son of Caius, and Marcus Porcius, son of Marcus, in their capacity as quinquennial duumviri, to demonstrate the honour of the colony, erected this sports complex at their own expense and donated it to the colonists for their perpetual use”. 
According to Breton, two of these inscriptions were found (found 13th November 1815) buried in the earth, one near the large south doorway, the other near one of the corridors. See Breton, Ernest. 1870. Pompeia, Guide de visite a Pompei, 3rd ed. Paris, Guerin.

II.6 Pompeii. December 2006.

Plaque now fixed to east wall of south exit from the Amphitheatre, leading south-west.

It read -

C. QVINCTIVS C. F. VALGVS
M. PORCIVS M. F[ilius]. DVO VIR.
QVINQ[uennales] COLONIAI HONORIS
CAUSSA SPECTACVLA DE SVA
PEQ[unia] FAC[iunda] COER[arunt] ET COLONEIS
LOCVM IN PERPETVOM DEDER[unt]              [CIL X 852]

 

According to Epigraphik-Datenbank Clauss/Slaby (See www.manfredclauss.de) this expands to

 

C(aius) Quinctius C(ai) f(ilius) Valgus

M(arcus) Porcius M(arci) f(ilius) duovir(i)

quinq(uennales) colonia<e=I> honoris

caus{s}a spectacula de sua

pe<c=Q>(unia) fac(iunda) coer(averunt) et colon{e}is

locum in perpetu<u=O>m deder(unt)            [CIL X 852]

 

According to Cooley, this translates as:

“Caius Quinctius Valgus, son of Gaius, and Marcus Porcius, son of Marcus, quinquennial duumvirs, for the honour of the colony, saw to the construction of the amphitheatre at their own expense and gave the area to the colonists in perpetuity”.

See Cooley, A. and M.G.L., 2004. Pompeii: A Sourcebook. London : Routledge, p. 21, B10.

 

According to Breton, two of these inscriptions were found (found 13th November 1815) buried in the earth, one near the large south doorway, the other near one of the corridors.

See Breton, Ernest. 1870. Pompeia, Guide de visite a Pompei, 3rd ed. Paris, Guerin.

 

II.6 Pompeii. December 2006. Ceiling plaster and vaulting on south exit corridor of Amphitheatre.

II.6 Pompeii. December 2006. Ceiling plaster and vaulting on south exit corridor of Amphitheatre.

 

 

Part:       1        2        3         4        5        6        7_