PompeiiinPictures

II.7.1 Pompeii. Palaestra or Palestra.

Excavated 1814 to 1816, 1933 and 1935 to 1939.

 

(Originally when excavated, this was numbered as Reg. II, Insula 10).

 

A group of 14 skeletons were found outside of the first doorway on the east side. (p.216)

A group of 17 victims were found on the west side of the pool. (p.215)

A group of 18 victims were found gathered in the latrine (p.222)

A group of 4 victims were found along the west portico (p.226)

Apart from these “groups of victims”, other individual victims were also found here.

For Maiuri’s “Scavo della “Grande Palestra” nel quartiere dell’Anfiteatro, -

see Notizie degli Scavi, Anno 1939, Fascicoli 7, 8, 9, on pages 165-238

 

For details of Della Corte’s “Le iscrizioni della “Grande Palestra” ad occidente dell’ Anfiteatro”. See Notizie degli Scavi, 1939, (p.239-327)

 

II.7.1 Pompeii. Palaestra. September 2015. Entrance doorway.

II.7.1 Pompeii. Palaestra. September 2015. Entrance doorway.

 

II.7.1 Pompeii. Palaestra. May 2012. Entrance. Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

II.7.1 Pompeii. Palaestra. May 2012. Entrance. Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

 

II.7.1 Pompeii. Palaestra. May 2012. Detail of entrance.  Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

II.7.1 Pompeii. Palaestra. May 2012. Detail of entrance. Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

 

II.7.1 Pompeii. Palaestra. May 2010. Entrance.

II.7.1 Pompeii. Palaestra. May 2010. Entrance.

 

II.7.1 Pompeii. Palaestra. December 2006. Entrance.
According to Garcia y Garcia,
Many bombs, at least 10, fell in the internal and external areas, damaging the palaestra excavated between 1935-39. 
The first bombs fell during the night incursion of 20th September 1943; the others fell during the following days between 21st to the 26th September 1943.
One of the most beautiful of the plaster-casts made was of a man covering his face with his hands in a manner of true abandonment and resignation.  
He was found at the eastern extremity of the southern portico of the Palestra, and shown by Maiuri in the Pompeii Antiquarium, replaced in 1947 by a restoration that had altered notably the original form. (P.195 and note 78).
See Garcia y Garcia, L., 2006. Danni di guerra a Pompei. Rome: L’Erma di Bretschneider.

II.7.1 Pompeii. Palaestra. December 2006. Entrance.

According to Garcia y Garcia,

Many bombs, at least 10, fell in the internal and external areas, damaging the palaestra excavated between 1935-39.

The first bombs fell during the night incursion of 20th September 1943; the others fell during the following days between 21st to the 26th September 1943.

One of the most beautiful of the plaster-casts made was of a man covering his face with his hands in a manner of true abandonment and resignation. 

He was found at the eastern extremity of the southern portico of the Palestra, and shown by Maiuri in the Pompeii Antiquarium, replaced in 1947 by a restoration that had altered notably the original form. (P.195 and note 78).

See Garcia y Garcia, L., 2006. Danni di guerra a Pompei. Rome: L’Erma di Bretschneider.

 

II.7.1 Pompeii. Palaestra. June 2012. Latrine building to south of II.7.1.

II.7.1 Pompeii. Palaestra. June 2012. Latrine building south of entrance at II.7.1.

 

II.7.1 Pompeii. Palaestra. December 2006. Entrance to latrine building II.7.11 to south of II.7.1.

II.7.1 Pompeii. Palaestra. December 2006. Walled-up entrance to latrine building to south of II.7.1.

 

II.7.1 Pompeii. Palaestra.  Plaster cast of victim found near the latrine, perhaps found crouching on the ground with his back against the wall of the south portico.  Now in VII.7.29 Forum granary market.
Other victims found along the south portico (p.225) –  Skeleton of a horse and its driver.  The skeleton of the horse had been found almost leaning against the portico wall; his legs folded on the ground, his body a little contracted but still reassured in its anatomical composure; his head rested on the ash bank.  Less than a metre from the animal's head, the skeleton of the person to whom the horse belonged was found.
Extraordinary detail: eleven beads of glass-paste were collected around the bones of the beast's neck; a necklace as it is still used today in Campania as part of the decoration of the animal.
Found towards the eastern extremity from the southern portico, and from which plaster-casts could be made because they both lay in the high layer of ash. The one was a beautiful young man's body with agile legs knocked down on the portico floor at the first fall of the ashes.  The other, the most tragically posed, was found leaning against the wall, kneeling, crouching on the ground, in that crouching position that is found in Neolithic tombs, with his head folded forward, bent almost between his knees, for the better protection of himself with his hands and cloak against the exhalation of asphyxiating gases. He had shoes on his feet and wore the typical cloak of the peasant, the “cuculla”, whose flaps he held tight against his mouth.  And in removing the ash under his knees, imprints of overlapping fabrics were noticed, as if the unfortunate man had found comfort in his tragic pose by shielding his knees with the few garments he could arrange. (p.225-6)
For Maiuri’s “Scavo della “Grande Palestra” nel quartiere dell’Anfiteatro, -
see Notizie degli Scavi, Anno 1939, Fascicoli 7, 8, 9, on pages 165-238

II.7.1 Pompeii. Palaestra.

Plaster cast of victim found near the latrine, perhaps found crouching on the ground with his back against the wall at the east end of the south portico.

Now in VII.7.29 Forum granary market.

 

Other victims found along the south portico (p.225) –

Skeleton of a horse and its driver.

The skeleton of the horse had been found almost leaning against the portico wall; his legs folded on the ground, his body a little contracted but still reassured in its anatomical composure; his head rested on the ash bank. Found less than a metre from the animal's head, was the skeleton of the person to whom the horse belonged. Extraordinary detail: eleven beads of glass-paste were collected around the bones of the beast's neck; a necklace as it is still used today in Campania as part of the decoration of the animal.

 

Found towards the eastern extremity from the southern portico, and from which plaster-casts could be made because they both lay in the high layer of ash.

The one was a beautiful young man's body with agile legs knocked down on the portico floor at the first fall of the ashes.

 

The other, the most tragically posed, was found leaning against the wall, kneeling, crouching on the ground, in that crouching position that is found in Neolithic tombs, with his head folded forward, bent almost between his knees, for the better protection of himself with his hands and cloak against the exhalation of asphyxiating gases. He had shoes on his feet and wore the typical cloak of the peasant, the cuculla”, whose flaps he held tight against his mouth.  And in removing the ash under his knees, imprints of overlapping fabrics were noticed, as if the unfortunate man had found comfort in his tragic pose by shielding his knees with the few garments he could arrange. (p.225-6)

 

For Maiuri’s “Scavo della “Grande Palestra” nel quartiere dell’Anfiteatro, - see Notizie degli Scavi, Anno 1939, Fascicoli 7, 8, 9, on pages 165-238

 

II.7.1 Pompeii. Palaestra. September 2015. On display as an exhibit in the Summer 2015 exhibition in the amphitheatre. When this body was cast, he was found to be tipped forwards, huddled up and bent double on his knees, when restored he was placed in this position. 
See Stefani, G. (2010). The Casts, exhibition at Boscoreale Antiquarium, 2010. (p.10)

II.7.1 Pompeii. Palaestra. September 2015. On display as an exhibit in the Summer 2015 exhibition in the amphitheatre.

 

“After the excavation of the Quadriporticus of the Theatres, between 1935 and 1939 the largest number of victims was found in this area, almost 100 bodies, 65 of which were found in the pumice layer and the rest in the debris left by the final 2 surges (4 and 5) that hit the city………

Only two casts have been successfully taken from all the bodies found in the Palestra:

one of an adult (see fig 3 on page 146 of this book, and also photo above) and the other:

according to Maiuri “the handsome body of a young man, one of those strong, agile young men from Campania, with athletic legs just made for running and for the last gasp of the race”.  The victim had been identified as an athlete, also because of the discovery near his body of bronze strigils, usually used by gymnasts”

See Guzzo, P. (ed), (2003). Tales from an eruption. Milano, Electa. (p.143, article by Tiziana Rocco, and (p.144) for photos of items found–

Gold and silver armband in form of a snake, SAP 6131

Bronze surgical instruments, SAP 6124, 6127, 6128

Different sized bronze cases with lids, for medicaments, SAP 6127, 6129a-e

Silver cup covered with foil embossed with scenes of the cult of Isis, NAP 6044.

Plaster cast of figure found near the latrine, crouching on the ground with his back against the wall of the east portico.)

 

II.7.1 Pompeii. May 2018. 
Plaster cast of victim found near the latrine of the Palaestra, perhaps, as portrayed here, found crouching on the ground with his back against the wall of the east portico. Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.
However, when this body was cast, he was found to be tipped forwards, huddled up and bent double on his knees, when restored he was placed in this position. 
See Stefani, G. (2010). The Casts, exhibition at Boscoreale Antiquarium, 2010. (p.10).

II.7.1 Pompeii. May 2018.

Plaster-cast of victim found near the latrine of the Palaestra, perhaps, as portrayed here, found crouching on the ground with his back against the wall of the east end of the south portico. Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

However, when this body was cast, he was found to be tipped forwards, huddled up and bent double on his knees, when restored he was placed in this position.

See Stefani, G. (2010). The Casts, exhibition at Boscoreale Antiquarium, 2010. (p.10).

 

II.7.1/II.7.11 Pompeii. “La forica della Palestra”. 
Looking east along south side towards the amphitheatre.
See Notizie degli Scavi, 1939, p. 191, fig.16.

II.7.1/II.7.11 Pompeii. “La forica della Palestra”.

Looking east along south side towards the amphitheatre.

See Notizie degli Scavi, 1939, p. 191, fig.16.

 

II.7.1 Pompeii. September 2015. Looking west from entrance along south wall.
The door on the left is the entrance to the latrine.
According to Maiuri –
“The waste-water from the swimming pool was used for washing the large latrine on the south side of the southern portico.”
See Notizie degli Scavi, 1939, (p.189)

II.7.1 Pompeii. September 2015. Looking west from entrance along south wall.

The door on the left is the entrance to the latrine.

According to Maiuri –

“The waste-water from the swimming pool was used for washing the large latrine on the south side of the southern portico.”

See Notizie degli Scavi, 1939, (p.189)

 

II.7.1 Pompeii. Palaestra. December 2006. Looking west along south portico.

II.7.1 Pompeii. Palaestra. December 2006. Looking west along south portico.

 

II.7.1 Pompeii. Palaestra. September 2015. Looking north-west from entrance doorway and south portico.

II.7.1 Pompeii. Palaestra. September 2015. Looking north-west from entrance doorway and south portico.

 

II.7.1 Pompeii. Palaestra. December 2006. Looking North West though south portico.

II.7.1 Pompeii. Palaestra. December 2006. Looking north-west though south portico.

 

II.7.1 Pompeii. Palaestra. Looking west along south side. Photographed 1970-79 by Günther Einhorn, picture courtesy of his son Ralf Einhorn.

II.7.1 Pompeii. Palaestra. Looking west along south side.

Photographed 1970-79 by Günther Einhorn, picture courtesy of his son Ralf Einhorn.

 

II.7.1 Pompeii. Palaestra. June 2012. Looking north along east side.

II.7.1 Pompeii. Palaestra. June 2012. Looking north along interior east side.

 

II.7.1 Pompeii. Palaestra. May 2010. Looking north along the east wall.

II.7.1 Pompeii. Palaestra. May 2010. Looking north along the exterior east wall.

 

II.7.1 Pompeii. Palaestra. May 2010. East wall between II.7.1 and II.7.2.

II.7.1 Pompeii. Palaestra. May 2010. East wall between II.7.1 and II.7.2.

 

II.7.1 Pompeii. Palaestra. December 2006. Wall from II.7.1 to II.7.2.

II.7.1 Pompeii. Palaestra. December 2006. Wall from II.7.1 to II.7.2.

 

II.7.1 Pompeii. Palaestra. March 2009. Looking west from top of the amphitheatre.

II.7.1 Pompeii. Palaestra. March 2009. Looking west from top of the amphitheatre.

 

II.7.1 Pompeii. Palaestra. June 2012. Looking towards the south side.

II.7.1 Pompeii. Palaestra. June 2012. Looking towards the south side.

 

II.7.1 Pompeii. Palaestra. June 2012. Looking towards the south-west corner.

II.7.1 Pompeii. Palaestra. June 2012. Looking towards the south-west corner.

 

II.7 Pompeii. June 2019. Looking towards south-west corner, from pool. Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

II.7 Pompeii. June 2019. Looking towards south-west corner, from pool. Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

 

II.7.1 Pompeii. June 2019. Looking north towards II.7.9, on right, along west side. Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

II.7.1 Pompeii. June 2019. Looking north towards II.7.9, on right, along west side. Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

 

II.7.1 Pompeii. Palaestra. September 2015. Looking north along the interior west side.

II.7.1 Pompeii. Palaestra. September 2015. Looking north along the interior west side.

 

II.7.1 Pompeii. Palaestra. September 2015. Looking north from south-west corner.

II.7.1 Pompeii. Palaestra. September 2015. Looking north from south-west corner.

 

II.7.1 Pompeii. Palaestra. April 2019. Looking north towards Vesuvius, in distance behind trees. 
Photo courtesy of Rick Bauer.

II.7.1 Pompeii. April 2019. Looking north across Palaestra towards Vesuvius, in distance behind trees.

Photo courtesy of Rick Bauer.

 

II.7.1 Pompeii. Palaestra. April 2018. Looking north-east from south-west corner.
Photo courtesy of Ian Lycett-King. Use is subject to Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial License v.4 International.

II.7.1 Pompeii. Palaestra. April 2018. Looking north-east from south-west corner.

Photo courtesy of Ian Lycett-King. Use is subject to Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial License v.4 International.

 

II.7.1 Pompeii. Palaestra. September 2015. Looking north-east from south-west corner.

II.7.1 Pompeii. Palaestra. September 2015. Looking north-east from south-west corner.

 

 

 

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Ultimo aggiornamento - Last updated: 14-Sep-2020 21:27